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WCC stands in solidarity with people of Kanaky New Caledonia

World Council of Churches general secretary Rev. Prof. Dr Jerry Pillay, on behalf of the global fellowship, expressed solidarity with the people of Kanaky New Caledonia as they cope with tension and blockades that have brought shortages of food, healthcare, and essential services.

WCC receives delegation from Kanaky New Caledonia

A delegation from the Front de libération nationale kanak et socialiste visited the World Council of Churches (WCC), sharing concerns about human rights and self-determination for the people in Kanaky New Caledonia. 

WCC General Recommendations for UN PFPAD Third Session (16-19 April 2024)

The World Council of Churches (WCC), a global fellowship of 352 churches representing more than half a billion Christians from around the world, has been deeply involved in the work of the United Nations from as early as 1946 through its Commission of the Churches on International Affairs (CCIA). The WCC is a platform for common action by churches on issues that negate or threaten the dignity of all people. 

WCC Programmes

Seven Weeks for Water 2024, week 6: "Cured water, peaceable people: A reflection from Pasifika (Pacific)"

The sixth reflection of the Seven Weeks for Water 2024 series of the WCC Ecumenical Water Network is written by Rev. Dr Jione Havea from the Pacific region. Reflecting on the interesting story of the Bible where Moses turns the bitter water of Marah into drinkable water, with the help of God, Havea argues that drinkable water can bring peace while lack of water is a source of conflict. Then he encourages the readers to advocate for water justice. 

Advocacy and prophetic witness for metanoia

The Kanak concept of “Do Kamo: the authentic human in a permanent becoming”, emphasizes that true human nature is not a fixed state—not something one is born with, but rather an ongoing process of maturation. This is a metaphor for personal growth and transformation, as individuals let go of their past selves and embrace their true identities. This transformation symbolizes shedding our primitive natures and embracing the qualities and potentials of a Do Kamo.